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How To: Install 1987-1993 Mustang Performance Automatic TV Cable

Posted 2/5/2016 by Landan Durham

Replace your worn out throttle valve cable and bushing with these simple instructions of Performance Automatic's heavy duty cable kit!

FOLLOW: 79 93 mustang , mustang , fox body , driveline , transmission , aod , performance automatic , tv cable

Performance Automatic AOD Throttle Valve Kickdown Cable

Since the doors opened in 1984, Performance Automatic has been delivering the ultimate in high performance transmissions, torque converters, and the related drivetrain components. Their countless hours spent on research and development allows for the production of some the best drivetrain components on the Mustang market.

If you own a 1987-93 Fox Body Mustang with an automatic transmission then you should be well aware of the infamous AOD throttle valve cable bushing. Overtime this poorly engineered part often cracks or completely breaks off from the throttle body making your AOD a ticking time bomb.

The best way to rid the plastic bushing plague, is to simply replace the entire factory assembly with this premium aftermarket cable from Performance Automatic. It features a heavy duty casing, it is fully adjustable, and was designed by Performance Automatic for the AOD to be a direct upgrade for your factory cable. Everything you need for installation is in the box. If your cable checks out good and doesn’t need to be replaced, simply pick up a Performance Automatic bushing and hairpin kit, and you’re good to go.


Required Tools

  • 1/4" Ratchet
  • 6" 1/4" Extension
  • Long Extension
  • 1/4" Swivel
  • 13mm Socket
  • 8mm Socket
  • 7mm Socket
  • 11/16" Open End Wrench
  • 7/16" Open End Wrench
  • 4mm Allen Key
  • Bolt Cutters
  • Flat Head Screwdriver

Installation Instructions

Step 1:

To begin installation, disconnect the negative battery cable. Anytime I am underneath a vehicle that involves work near the starter, the negative cable always gets disconnected. Loosen the hose clamp securing the intake pipe to the throttle body. If the factory air box is still in the car, remove the clips securing the lid and tray. However, if you own a mass air equipped car, disconnect the electrical connection. Remove the intake pipe from the car.

Step 2:

Rotate the plastic lock on the factory throttle valve cable with an 11/16” open end wrench. The two plastic tabs will line up with the provisions on the bracket. Now that the cable is free, you can cut it at the base of the plastic housing or tie it out of the way. We chose to cut ours since its secured to the bell housing via a loop bracket. This will allow us to pull the cable out of the bracket from underneath the car. Cut the cable with a pair of heavy duty wire or bolt cutters.

Step 3:

Now, grab your new cable and remove one of the two 11/16 inch nuts and the only lock washer from the end of the cable. Slide one of the included stop washers onto the cable. Run the cable down the top of the bell housing and the same direction as the factory cable. Position the end of the cable through the bracket on the throttle body. Slide on the other stop washer, then the lock washer, followed by the 11/16 inch nut. Finger tighten and then support the car via lift or jack stands.

Step 4:

When you get under the car, don’t confuse the TV cable with the gear select cable. The TV cable is toward the top and obviously coming down from the top of the bell housing. Use a flat head screwdriver to pop off the clip from the stud on the transmission linkage. Remove the 8mm bolt from the cable bracket on the transmission. A swivel and long extension will be your best bet when removing this bolt.

Step 5:

Pry the cable guide from the bracket and then pull down on the cable freeing it from the bell housing bracket. Reach up and navigate the new cable in the direction you need it to go. Slide the included cable guide into the machined race on the cable. This may be hidden behind the small rubber dust cover. If so, simply slide the cover out of the way. Position the cable guide so that it is oriented the same way as the factory guide. Reinstall the previously removed 8mm bolt.

Step 6:

At the end of the cable, thread the small, included 5/32 inch nut until it bottoms out. Now, position the included return spring over the cable. It may help if you carefully pull out on the cable to allow for more work room. Slide the included, small stop washer over the cable followed by the quick disconnect. Tighten the quick disconnect until it bottoms out. Then, finger tighten the 5/32 inch nut to the stop washer. Here’s the tricky part! Patiently secure the quick disconnect to the stud on the transmission linkage. Double check your work underneath the car, and move back to the engine bay.

Step 7:

Slide the included throttle lever bushing into the bracket on the throttle body. Make sure the head of the bushing is on the top. Back off on the Allen head set screw and pass the cable through the cable end adjuster. Slide the adjuster through the bushing and then use the included cotter pin to secure the adjuster. Before I tightened everything down, I had a buddy pull the slack out of the cable and then tightened the set screw with a 4mm Allen Key and 7/16 inch open end wrench. Reinstall your intake and tighten the hose clamp. Tighten the nuts on the cable with a pair of 11/16 inch open end wrenches. Reconnect your negative battery cable, double check everything and you’re all done!


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About the Video

1987-1993 Mustang Performance Automatic AOD TV Cable Install

Check out our YouTube channel for even more tech tips, installation videos, how-tos, and more. The best place to go for anything Mustang related!

Published on 2016-01-27
Rid the plastic bushing plague in your 1987-93 AOD equipped Fox Body Mustang with a Performance Automatic aftermarket throttle cable. It features a heavy duty casing, it is fully adjustable, and was designed by Performance Automatic for the AOD to be a direct upgrade for your factory cable. Everything needed for installation is in the box.

Mustang Fitment: 1987 (87), 1988 (88), 1989 (89), 1990 (90), 1991 (91), 1992 (92), 1993 (93) w/ AOD Transmission
Transcript
Hey! What’s going on guys? Landan here with Late Model Restoration. Today this video is going to cover my review and installation of Performance Automatic’s TV or throttle valve kick down cable fitting your 1987-1993 Fox Body Mustang.

Since the doors opened in 1984, Performance Automatic has been delivering the ultimate in high performance transmissions, torque converters, and the related drivetrain components. Their countless hours spent on research and development allows for the production of some the best drivetrain components on the Mustang market.

If you own a 1987-93 Fox Mustang with an automatic transmission then you should be well aware of the infamous AOD throttle valve cable bushing. Overtime these silly things often crack or completely break off from the throttle body making your AOD a ticking time bomb.

The best way to rid the plastic bushing plague, is to simply replace the entire factory assembly with this premium aftermarket cable from Performance Automatic. It features a heavy duty casing, it is fully adjustable, and was designed by Performance Automatic for the AOD to be a direct upgrade for your factory cable. Everything you need for installation is in the box. If your cable checks out good and doesn’t need to be replaced, simply pick up a Performance Automatic bushing and hairpin kit, and you’re good to go.

Well alright guys, follow along as I walk you through the detailed steps on installing Performance Automatic’s throttle valve cable into this 1987 Convertible 5.0. A little “FYI” on this one before I begin, the instructions state that you tie your old cable up out of the way since it is secured to the top of the bellhousing. Well, our meticulous nature here at LMR thought otherwise. We noticed the cable was secured to the bell housing. However it was attached via a loop bracket that was bolted to one of the top bell housing bolts. So we simply cut the cable at the top and then pulled it out of the bracket from the bottom. This method is optional and you should only go about it with careful consideration.

To begin installation, disconnect the negative battery cable. Anytime I am underneath a vehicle that involves work near the starter, the negative cable always gets disconnected. Loosen the hose clamp securing the intake pipe to the throttle body. If the factory air box is still in the car, remove the clips securing the lid and tray. However, if you own a mass air equipped car, disconnect the electrical connection. Remove the intake pipe from the car. Rotate the plastic lock on the factory throttle valve cable with an 11/16” open end wrench.

The two plastic tabs will line up with the provisions on the bracket. Now that the cable is free, you can cut it at the base of the plastic housing or tie it out of the way. We chose to cut ours since it’s secured to the bell housing via a loop bracket. This will allow us to pull the cable out of the bracket from underneath the car. Cut the cable with a pair of heavy duty wire or bolt cutters. Now, grab your new cable and remove one of the two 11/16 inch nuts and the only lock washer from the end of the cable.

Slide one of the included stop washers onto the cable. Run the cable down the top of the bell housing and the same direction as the factory cable. Position the end of the cable through the bracket on the throttle body. Slide on the other stop washer, then the lock washer, followed by the 11/16 inch nut. Finger tighten and then support the car via lift or jack stands. When you get under the car, don’t confuse the TV cable with the gear select cable. The TV cable is toward the top and obviously coming down from the top of the bell housing.

Use a flat head screwdriver to pop off the clip from the stud on the transmission linkage. Remove the 8mm bolt from the cable bracket on the transmission. A swivel and long extension will be your best bet when removing this bolt. Pry the cable guide from the bracket and then pull down on the cable freeing it from the bell housing bracket. Reach up and navigate the new cable in the direction you need it to go. Slide the included cable guide into the machined race on the cable. This may be hidden behind the small rubber dust cover.

If so, simply slide the cover out of the way. Position the cable guide so that it is oriented the same way as the factory guide. Reinstall the previously removed 8mm bolt. At the end of the cable, thread the small, included 5/32 inch nut until it bottoms out. Now, position the included return spring over the cable. It may help if you carefully pull out on the cable to allow for more work room. Slide the included, small stop washer over the cable followed by the quick disconnect.

Tighten the quick disconnect until it bottoms out. Then, finger tighten the 5/32 inch nut to the stop washer. Here’s the tricky part! Patiently secure the quick disconnect to the stud on the transmission linkage. Double check your work underneath the car, and move back to the engine bay.

Slide the included throttle lever bushing into the bracket on the throttle body. Make sure the head of the bushing is on the top. Back off on the Allen head set screw and pass the cable through the cable end adjuster. Slide the adjuster through the bushing and then use the included cotter pin to secure the adjuster.

Before I tightened everything down, I had a buddy pull the slack out of the cable and then tightened the set screw with a 4mm Allen Key and 7/16 inch open end wrench. Reinstall your intake and tighten the hose clamp. Tighten the nuts on the cable with a pair of 11/16 inch open end wrenches. Reconnect your negative battery cable, double check everything and you’re all done!

As far as installation goes, this one is extremely easy guys! I would allow yourself around an hour and a half to two hours from start to finish with the only reason being that your work space underneath the car is a little on the tight side. Once installed, revert to a shop manual for proper control pressure. If you don’t have access to a pressure gauge, the rule-of-thumb is that overdrive should arrive at 40mph under mild acceleration. If upshifts occur too soon, the TV cable needs to be tighter. However, if upshifts are too late, the TV cable tension needs to be loosened.

With that being said guys, if you want to see more awesome product reviews and installs for your Fox Body Mustang, then I invite you to subscribe to our YouTube channel if you haven’t already done so. While you’re at it, head back over to the site and pick up a Performance Automatic TV cable kit at LMR.com!